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All Posts Tagged: Vet Tips

PODCAST: Rat Poison and Pets

Unfortunately, many pets get into toxins — even toxins that were meant to get rid of pests like mice and rats. An extremely common type of toxicity is rodenticide, or rat poison. There are three main groups of rat poison used, and they can all be very toxic to dogs and cats (and our exotic pets, too).

Patients that have the best prognosis from this type of toxicity are usually those that are actually seen eating the rat poison by their owners, who then bring them in for treatment right away.

© 2011 Greenbrier Emergency Animal Hospital. All rights reserved.

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PODCAST: Giardia … cha cha cha …

Diarrhea has a number of causes, but one that we’ve seen quite a bit in our patients recently is Giardia, a parasite that is transmitted in stool (Giardia can be transmitted to humans in this way, but people most often get this parasite from contaminated water). Once a pet is infected, it will typically take 5-12 days in dogs and 5-16 days in cats for the parasite to be found in the stool — however, diarrhea can occur before the parasite actually shows up in the stool.

To diagnose Giardia, your veterinarian will need a fresh stool sample from your pet. As this parasite cannot be detected by the naked eye, the doctor will examine the sample under a microscope. Sometimes the test may need to be repeated, as this parasite can shed intermittently — so while an initial test may come up negative, further tests may come up positive. A newer variety of test is the “snap test,” which tests for Giardia proteins in the stool. The snap test does help improve diagnosis; however, while almost all veterinarians have the capability to look at a stool sample under the microscope, the snap test is less readily available, and not all veterinarians will be able to offer it.

© 2011 Greenbrier Emergency Animal Hospital. All rights reserved.

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PODCAST: Pets and Snake Bites — Act Quickly!

During the warm-weather months, our slithery, venomous snake friends become more active. And snake bites are a very common problem in the summertime. Our pets are very curious creatures and tend to lead with their noses and their front limbs, so that’s where we see the most bites (on the face and front legs). These bites often cause extreme pain, swelling and bruising, and that’s typically what you as an owner will notice first, if you don’t happen to see the snake itself. You may also see puncture marks that may be bleeding or oozing.

© 2011 Greenbrier Emergency Animal Hospital. All rights reserved.

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PODCAST: Heat Stroke in Dogs

As the heat and humidity of the summer months are approaching quickly here in Central Virginia, pet owners should be aware of the dangers of heat stroke, one of the more common summer pet emergencies in dogs. Heat stroke is a situation in which a pet’s body temperature has risen way above normal and needs immediate veterinary attention. Unfortunately, our domestic pets don’t sweat the way we do to dissipate excess heat, so they aren’t as efficient at cooling their bodies as we are — and heat stroke can result. The condition can become fatal rapidly if left untreated, but is easily preventable with some common-sense measures.

© 2011 Greenbrier Emergency Animal Hospital. All rights reserved.

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PODCAST: Ticks … Suck!

The down-and-dirty about ticks! Since the weather has warmed up this spring, you’ve probably noticed more and more of these awful little critters. You might find them attached to your pet, on your clothes or even attached to your skin. Give our podcast a listen, and learn a little more about the diseases ticks carry — and how to prevent them.

© 2011 Greenbrier Emergency Animal Hospital. All rights reserved.

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PODCAST: Common Household Pet Toxins

Our first podcast — and many more to come! This first podcast focuses on common household pet toxins — we’ll identify these toxins and briefly discuss treatments and outcomes. There are some tasty treats that you might never suspect are toxic to your pets.

© 2011 Greenbrier Emergency Animal Hospital. All rights reserved.

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